Advertisements
Tag Archives: tutorial

{easy as pie} Six Layer Tulle Skirt

28 May

TulleSkirtCollage

Today I would like to share with you this simple to make full length tulle skirt.  I can easily get one made in the span of one nap time (under two hours) which is a bonus!  These skirts are a great base for other costumes. They give an added pouf underneath princess or fairy dresses.  Or for little girls who just love to put on the glam they could just be worn on their own (with leggings or tights underneath)  As you can see, my daughter very much enjoyed walking around in this snazzy skirt.  This skirt was made in size 2, but the instructions are very adaptable to any size (just add more width and length to the fabric for larger sizes).  The supplies below are also for size 2.

supplies

1/4 yard satin fabric for the base

2 1/2 yards of tulle

19″ of 1/2″ elastic

safety pin

thread

basic sewing supplies

We are going to construct the top or base part of the skirt first.  Take your satin fabric and cut a rectangle that measures 10″ x 36″.   Fold this rectangle in half lengthwise with the right sides facing out.  The long raw edges should be at the bottom.  From the top folded edge of your fabric, measure down 1″ on one of the short sides.  Mark this with a pin.  Measure down 1″ more from this pin and mark this spot with a second pin.

pic1

Unfold the fabric and this time fold it in half width wise, right sides together.  Your short edges should now be matched up, and the wrong sides of the fabric facing out.  Pin these two edges together.  You are going to sew them together with a 1/2″ seam BUT DO NOT sew in between the two pins that you put in during the previous step.  So you will: Start from one edge, sew until you get to the first marking pin, stop (remember to back stitch at the beginning and end) and then start sewing again after the second marking needle until you get to the other edge. (See picture below; sew along the dotted lines)

pic2

Your skirt base should now be circular.  Fold it in half so that the right sides are facing out and the raw edges meet up.  There should be a little hole along the seam, make sure this hole is facing outwards; it should be 1″ from the top of your skirt base.  This hole is where you will insert the elastic later, so we need to make a casing for the elastic.  Starting at the top of the hole, sew all the way around the skirt base.  See the dotted lines in the following picture.

pic3.1

Next we need to start at the bottom of the hole and sew all the way around to complete the casing.

pic4.1

The skirt base is all done, see, I told you it was easy!  Now lets work on the tulle.  For my skirt I cut six long strips of tulle.  They measured 13″ x 60″, you can sew more than one piece together to get to the 60″ if you need to.  After you have cut/assembled all six of your strips, take one and fold it in half lengthwise, right sides together.  Sew the edges together with 1/2″ seam allowance.  Repeat this step with the five remaining strips.  Take three of your tulle skirt pieces and (keeping them turned inside out) put one inside of the other.  Line up the top edges of all three layers (this can be a little fussy!) and pin them together all around the top.  Sew a gathering stitch along the top pinned edge.  Make sure that the gathered edge is now the same width around as your skirt base.  If not, pull the threads to tighten or loosen it accordingly.pic5

Grab your skirt base.  Pin the gathered edge of your tulle skirt along the outer raw edge of your skirt base (the outer edge is the side that DOES NOT have the hole for the casing)  You are pinning these right sides together, so your tulle skirt should still be inside out, and your skirt base should be right side out.  Stitch them together with a 1/2″ seam allowance.  Sew with the tulle facing up.

pic6.1

Gather the three remaining tulle skirt layers and put them one inside of the other; sew together with a gathering stitch just like you did before.  Open up the bottom of your skirt base and push the attached tulle backwards, away from the inner raw edge that has nothing attached to it.  Make sure the skirt base is still facing right side out.  This is kind of tricky to explain, hopefully this picture will demonstrate what you need to do.  You are going to pin the gathered edge of your second layer of tulle to this inner raw edge of the skirt base.  Again, right sides together: the skirt will be inside out.

pic7

Are you with me?  Hopefully that all made sense…we are almost finished!  Sew the second layer of tulle to the skirt base, just like you did with the first layer.  Next flip your skirt so that it’s right side out.  Press your seams all the way around where the skirt base connects with the tulle.  While you are doing this, tug gently on the tulle so that the seam is pushed up inside of the skirt base.  Line up the two bottom edges of the skirt base, stitch all the way around the bottom edge to connect the two pieces together.  This part can get a bit tricky, just keep your tulle pulled downwards so that your seam stays up inside the skirt base and so that you don’t catch any of the tulle in your stitching.

pic8

All you need to do now is insert your elastic (I used 19″, the width of my daughter’s waist)  Attach a safety pin to one end of the elastic and thread it through the casing.  Stitch the elastic together at the opening and then hand-stitch the opening shut. Voila!  A pretty skirt for dress up time! **My daughter is pretty tall, this skirt should come down to the ankles, any longer and it will just be tripped over.  The great thing about tulle is that it does not fray – you can trim your skirt to any length after it is finished.**

anna1 collage3

Thank you for stopping by today, I hope you enjoyed this tutorial.  I would love to hear your comments on this post!

signature

Advertisements

Dress Up Time D.I.Y ~ Cinderella Peasant Dress

21 May

Cinderellatitle1

Today I am going to share this simple Cinderella Peasant Dress costume {size 2T} with you.  I think little chores are much more fun when you are dressed like Cinderella!  Peasant dresses are very easy sewing projects, in fact I think that one of my very first sewing projects was a peasant dress.  When I first learned how to make one, I followed a great tutorial from Pretty Prudent.  This Cinderella dress is just a slight variation from this peasant dress.  Since most of the steps are the same, except for the skirt, I don’t want to re-write someone else’s tutorial.  Instead I will have you read their tutorial and tell you what I did differently.

Here are the supplies that you will need, for the dress only.  I will tell you about the apron after the dress is out of the way!

supplies

~Fabric: You will need three different colors, but it’s all plain cotton.  I found mine in the bargain bin, it does not have to be expensive!  Sleeves: Light/Sky Blue 1/4 yard, Bodice: Dark/Chocolate Brown 1/4 yard, Skirt: Light/Coffee Brown 1/2 yard.

~35″ of 1/4″ elastic.

~Thread and basic sewing supplies

Below are the measurements for the dress.  You will cut two of the bodice pieces on the fold.  Cut along the red lines to create an armhole (a basic J shape, 6″ down) and a sloping neckline.

You will also need to cut two of the skirt pieces, and two of the sleeves (on the fold).

Size 2T

Cinderella Peasant Measurements

Cut out all of your pattern pieces above.  You are going to make the bodice by following the instructions here: Long Sleeve Peasant Dress Tutorial.  Start from Step 2: Cut Out Neckline and Armhole.  To be clear, while you are following the peasant dress tutorial, you will be using the two bodice pieces and the two sleeve pieces to create the bodice.  You will not be doing anything with the skirt until you come back to this page.

DO NOT:  Hem the bottom of the dress (bodice) or insert elastic into the sleeves.

Creating The Skirt

You should now have your bodice made, with the finished sleeves attached.  The bodice should have a raw edge along the bottom.  Are we on the same step? Good, let’s create the skirt and finish the dress.  Take your two rectangular skirt pieces and sew them right sides together down both of the shorter sides with 1/2″ seam allowance.  Use a zig-zag stitch to finish the seam.  Press your seams flat.  Fold the bottom of your skirt over 1/4″ to the wrong side and press with your iron.  Fold it over again and press; hem the bottom of your skirt.  Sew a gathering stitch around the top of your skirt and make sure it is the same width around as the bottom of your bodice.

Attach Skirt to the Bodice

Pin the top of the skirt to the bottom of the bodice, right sides together.  The easiest way is to have your bodice turned right side out, and your skirt inside out.  Place your bodice upside down into the top of the skirt and pin around the top.  It is a good idea to tuck the sleeves out of the way so that they don’t get in the way of your sewing.  Sew the bodice and skirt together using a 3/4″ seam allowance.  Use a zig-zag stitch to finish off the edge of the seam.

Press the seam upwards (towards the bodice) with your iron.  Now you are going to stitch along the top of the seam, all the way around, to create an elastic casing (make sure you are using thread that matches the chocolate brown bodice).  Leave 2″ open so that you can insert your elastic.  Take 20″ of 1/4″ elastic and attach it to a safety pin.  Thread it through the casing.  Sew the ends of the elastic together and then sew the opening shut.

And that’s all!  I left the elastic out of the sleeves because I noticed that Cinderella’s sleeves are loose, but of course you could make yours any way you wish.

pic2 pic3

I also made an apron with an applique to go along with the dress.  It was very time consuming, and it was my first attempt at creating something like this, but here is a quick look at how I did it.

First I found a clip-art picture online of one of the bird characters from Cinderella, here is what my applique was supposed to look like:

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

I have to say that my little bird didn’t turn out quite so happy looking, rather a little worried looking!

Supplies used: various scraps of fabric, heat n bond, black thread, basic sewing supplies.

I printed the bird and cut it out around the outer edges.  I pinned it to some blue fabric that already had some heat n bond applied to the back of it.  I cut the bird shape out of the blue fabric (leave the back of the heat n  bond on, do not peel it off yet)

pic4

Next I cut out pieces of the bird that were not blue (ie the hat, vest, beak, etc…) and pinned them to coordinating colors of fabric – these pieces of fabric also had heat n bond applied to the back.  I cut out each little piece of the bird and applied them to my blue main bird piece, like a puzzle.  Peeling off the back of the heat n bond I pressed each piece into place with my iron.  Here is the little bird coming together: pic5 pic6

After all of the pieces were in place I peeled off the backing on my main (blue) bird piece and positioned it where I wanted on the apron skirt.  Then, using black thread, I stitched all of the features and outlines onto the bird.  I used a zig-zag stitch, setting the length at almost zero.  The width of the stitch varied, as you can see that some of the lines on the bird are thicker than others – for example the black parts of the eyes are also done using a wide zig-zag stitch.

pic7

apronIt can be pretty tricky to get the facial details just right, as I mentioned before, my bird seems to look a bit worried and the original picture the bird looked happy!  As for the Cinder-Calleigh lettering, I don’t have a fancy embroidery sewing machine so this is just done freehand, again with a zig-zag stitch on a very short stitch length setting.

Thanks for stopping by today, I hope you have enjoyed this post!

signature

The Summer Social Dress {free tutorial and pattern size 2 & 6}

2 May

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

 

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAFun, flirty, and summer-y sweet~ This is what I had in mind when I created The Summer Social Dress.  I am so pleased to finally be able to show you this dress,  I have been working on it for awhile now!   The fabric is the new line by Tasha Noel for Riley Blake Designs “Little Red Riding Hood”.  Riley Blake had sent me a good sampling of this line for a tutorial I am writing for their Cutting Corner’s College (publish date May 27th).  I had enough left over to create this gorgeous dress – the exact fabrics are Little Scallops Aqua, and Little Floral White.   The aqua and red color scheme is gorgeous and the little characters are too cute!  I had an elaborate outdoor Spring photo shoot in mind but alas the unpredictable Alberta weather did not cooperate!  Can you believe it snowed on April 29th, I had planned to take the pictures on April 30th.  I just could not ask my sweet little models to go outside in -6 celsius weather in these summer outfits.  I was kind of bummed to take the pictures indoors.  I had an entire pictorial in my mind; a story to go along with the dress. Then I had a bright idea.  Why not make my own computerized spring scene and put my models inside?  So now I give you the Summer Social Dress.  Click here for easy printable instructions and pattern: Summer Social Dress

Dress1

Dress2

dress3

dress4.1

Picture6

dress5

Too cute, right?  The dress is very easy to make and I think any girl would love to wear it.  You can also make it as a summer-y top instead – like these pictures:

collage4 collage5

 

I hope you have enjoyed this post!  Here again are the printable instructions and free pattern in size 2 & 6: Summer Social Dress Tutorial

signature

The Great Gatsby is Coming – Here are 15 FREE Gatsby-Inspired Fonts!

22 Apr

 

header1

I could just scream with excitement.  We are so very close to the release of Great Gatsby in movie theaters, May 10th to be exact.  I have such high hopes for this movie.  Once again Leonardo DiCaprio will be teaming up with Baz Luhrmann. Their first movie together, Romeo and Juliet, was the be-all and end-all of my teenage years.  I first watched this movie in the theater with my at-the-moment boyfriend and some friends.  When it was finished I was amazed, but my boyfriend `just didn`t get all of the Shakespeare`, I then knew he was not a keeper.  A few months later I purchased a copy of the movie when I was studying in Mexico and I must have watched it 50 times.  The costuming, the soundtrack, the characters, everything was monumental. And then there was Leo sputtering romantic lines with his smooth skin and blue eyes – I was Seventeen and captivated.

Coincidentally I was also about Seventeen the first time I read the novel The Great Gatsby in English Lit class.  It has to be one of my top ten favorite novels. Baz Luhrmann is the perfect director for this movie.  There will be lavish, larger than life, parties.  There will be wild and over the top characters.  The costumes will be amazing, I absolutely love 1920`s inspired clothing – once you are done looking at the free fonts scroll down to see two of my FAVORITE 1920`s inspired dress tutorials.  So to celebrate the release of this movie, I have rounded up some fun (free) fonts for you, I hope you enjoy them!  The following is a list, please click on the font names below the list to be directed to the free download.

Gatsby fonts

 

1. Upper East Side

2. Birmingham

3. Roarin`Twenties Counterfeit

4.Gatsby

5.Strange Rituals

6. Lemondrop

7. Fashion Victim

8. Chapleau

9. TallDeco

10. Herald Square

11. Passion

12. Odalisque

13. Riesling

14. Park Lane

15. Betty Noir

 

I also thought I would mention these two GORGEOUS little dress tutorials that are 1920`s inspired.  I am hoping that the Great Gatsby movie sparks a huge fashion trend!

I love this drop waist sailor dress from Me Sew Crazy – I actually make and sell this dress in my Etsy Shop

Untitled-2

This Zelda Fitzgerald inspired dress is just gorgeous, you can find the full tutorial and pattern here: Fitzgerald In Lace by Sewing In No Man`s Land

d78fec1dfda057eb650d81bccff9eb14

Thank you for stopping by today, I hope you have enjoyed this post!!

signature

Vintage Postage Stamp Necklace

9 Apr

title

I think I was about Ten years old when my grandmother gave me this stamp book collection. The details about where it came from are a bit hazy, I believe she got it from a woman that she worked for. It has captured my imagination for years. The date written on the inside is 1899, well over one hundred years ago and the name is a bit hard to read but the first name is Mary, and the last name is Larew. I wonder who she was? Did she have lots of pen-pals to collect these stamps? The book itself looks magical and mysterious to me. Inside there are stamps from all over the world, even from places that don’t even exist anymore: The Straits Settlement (a group of British territories in South East Asia), Ceylon (now Sri Lanka), Orange Free State (currently a part of South Africa), and more.

Several years ago I took my book and visited a Philatelist. I did not want to sell my book, but I did wonder what the value was (Side note: Does anyone else watch Pawn Stars and cringe when a person walks in and says “Yeah this was my great Grandpa’s prized possession, but I would like to go buy a steak dinner and do some gambling…” sheesh). As it turns out, Mary Larew did not attach them to the book correctly. Also most of the stamps are used and have some sort of post mark on them. In the eyes of the stamp collecting world they aren’t worth a whole lot, but they are still my prize. For the last 23 years my stamp book has moved from college, to apartments, to houses, everywhere with me, but I have to say that it mostly sits inside a drawer and I don’t see it a whole lot. Sadly the book just keeps getting older and in worse shape. More stamps fall out all the time, you can see in the picture all of the little white tabs where stamps used to be attached. Recently I had been thinking about ways that I could display some of the beautiful stamps in the collection and preserve them better. I came across this tutorial on Happy Hour Projects: Glass Map Necklaces. Jewelry would be the perfect way to display these stamps, they also make a beautiful keepsake.

stampCollage

I created my necklace very similar to the Glass Map Necklace on Happy Hour Projects, so go and read her tutorial, it is very quick, and I will then tell you what I did differently.

necklace 1 The only real difference was the contents of the necklace. Instead of using a map clipping, I used a grey chevron fabric. I traced around the glass cabochon and then cut on the inside of the line that I had traced. At this time it would be a good idea just to make sure that your fabric circle fits properly inside of the bezel. Next brush the top of your fabric circle in Mod Podge. Pick out your beautiful postage stamp and place it on the fabric where you would like it to go. You can center it or have it offset, both would look great. Apply some more Mod Podge to the top of your stamp and follow the rest of Adrianne’s instructions to assemble your necklace.

Let’s talk about the supplies for a moment. It is very easy to find these glass necklace sets on Etsy. Have a look around, I like to click on the category “Craft Supplies” on the left hand side before starting my search. There are also lots of other types of jewelry supplies that would look beautiful using this tutorial: Keychains, Rings, Cuff Links, Earrings, Bobby Pins, and different types of necklace pendants: Here is an antique looking key pendant that looks gorgeous: Antique Keys Vintage Glass Pendant Charm. As for stamps again you can find a boat load of them on Etsy! If you do have a local stamp collecting shop you can usually find large packets of used stamps there for a fairly low cost. I found that brightly colored stamps with less postmarks do look the best. Plus the glass cabochon magnifies them, so something with a nice picture looks good too.

Here are a couple of the necklaces I made:

U.S Postal 2 Cent Washington Stamp:

pic1

I love this one from the Republic of Austria, I believe the stamp is from the mid 1800’s:

pic4

Thank you again for stopping by, I hope you have enjoyed this post!

pic3

signature

How To Create A Sweet Applique Using Picmonkey

2 Apr

appliqueCollage

 

Today I would like to show you how I use PicMonkey to create beautiful appliques for my personalized baby quilts and many other projects!  Why use PicMonkey?  If you are like me and live in the stone age with no fancy crafting tools like a Silhouette Cameo, this is a great option.  PicMonkey has a lot of simple shapes and great fonts and it’s easy to play around with the sizes and get your design exactly the way you want it.  Also I like this method because I can make sure that the letters are the perfect size to fit inside the design.  I’m sure there are many ways to create templates or designs for your applique, this is just how I like to do it!

What can you use this for?  There are so many things you could personalize, blankets, onesies, skirts, shirts, banners, bags or backpacks, framed art, I don’t know, take your pick!

Start by going to PicMonkey and click on “Edit A Photo”  Choose any photo, it doesn’t matter because we are going to put an overlay right on top of it.  Click on the overlay tab on the left side – it is the button that has the little shapes, fifth from the top.

comp1

 

Click on the geometric overlay and select the rectangle, the first one.  Expand it to go over top of your picture and click on the white color to turn it into a blank canvas.

comp2

 

Next, staying in the overlay section, click on the “labels” tab.  You can select whatever you like, the non-royale labels have the simplest lines which are best for applique designs.  Here is what I chose:

comp3

 

Now you can add a word to your design, or whatever you like to your design.  Select the text button on the left side (the “P” button) As I mentioned, I use this particular applique design for a personalized baby quilt that I sell in my Etsy Shop.  Expand or turn your word to make it fit exactly the way you like in your design.  I would advise against using fonts that are too complicated (probably like the one that I have used) because they are more difficult to cut out.

comp4

 

Save your design and print it.  When you print your applique template, you can usually select the size that you want it to print at that time.  Take some heat n bond and press it to the back side of a piece of fabric for your main (outer) shape.  Cut out your outer shape and pin it to the fabric and cut the shape out.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

 

Next cut your letters out of the design.  Again take the fabric that you are going to use for the letters and apply some heat n bond to the back of it.  When you apply the heat n bond first it makes it much easier to cut out your design, it’s more like cutting paper than fabric.  This let’s you get more detail and exact cuts.  Pin the letters to the fabric and cut out each one.  You will notice I cut the paper around the letters, then pinned it to the fabric and cut out the exact design.  This will give you more space to pin the letter to the fabric.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAPeel off the backing of the heat n bond and arrange the letters on your main design.  Press them in to place when they are exactly where you want them.  At this point you would stitch around the lettering with a tight zig-zag stitch.  I used a heat n bond ultra for my letters which doesn’t require stitching.  Next peel the backing off of your main applique piece and place it where you would like it to go on your quilt/shirt/onesie – whatever project you are decorating! Iron it in to place and use a tight zig zag stitch around the outer edge.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

I think it looks beautiful! What a great way to personalize your project.

pic2

Here is a design that I am working on for another project, it is quite a bit more complicated.  I will let you know how it turns out!

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Thank you for stopping by, I hope you have enjoyed this little tutorial!

signature



 

The Sweet Jessie {ruffle party dress} free tutorial & size 2 pattern

28 Mar

Sweet Jessie Collage

Well this is it, the grand finale of my Disney fun month!  I hope you have enjoyed the Disney themed posts these past four weeks.  This may be the end of “Disney Fun Month” but I can promise you this is not the end of Disney related posts on Sweet Benanna & Sam (hint: I am already working on some awesome sewing projects that are Cinderella and Tiana related…)

For the grand finale I am bringing you “The Sweet Jessie” ruffle party dress.  I think Jessie gets the short end of the stick when it comes to girl Disney characters.  She’s not glamorous like a princess and I think because of this she isn’t as popular with the girls.  I (for one) think Jessie is a great character.  She’s strong and brave, and just a little stubborn.  She also has her romantic side too.  I like to think that if Jessie were invited to a princess ball that she might wear something like this ruffle party dress.  Fancy satin mixed with sparkly denim and cow print – so much fun!  In this tutorial you will find a free pattern to make a size 2 dress.  I hope you enjoy it – and if you don’t want to go with the Jessie theme, this dress is still beautiful with “normal” fabric { eg.  no cow print or denim}.

jesseanna1 jessieanna

Okay, enough with the cute pictures, let’s get to work!

supplies

—————————————————————————————————————————————

~Pattern: Please click on all three of these separate links and print each one:  Jessie Front Bodice (Size 2), Jessie Back Bodice (size 2), Jessie Sleeves& Collar

~1 yard white satin material

~1/2 yard cow print – you could use faux animal fur material, minky, or even a cotton cow print.

~1/2 yard denim – I found a nice sparkle denim in the bargain section of our local fabric store

~1/2 yard yellow/gold colored satin

~ 15″ of 1/4″ elastic

~3 buttons (I used some gold-looking buttons)

~ scraps of red sequins (optional)

~thread and basic sewing supplies/sewing machine & Fabri-tac (fabric glue)

————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————–

After you have printed your pattern, cut all pieces as indicated.  I used white satin fabric for all of the bodice pieces except for the collar, I used the yellow satin for that.

In addition to the bodice pieces you will need to cut the following:

For the skirt~  12″ long x 42″ wide (42″ was the length of my fabric) in white satin

For the sash~ 4 1/2″x 60″ in yellow/gold satin

For the ruffles~ 7″ x 60″ you will need five of these – two in denim, two in cow print, one in yellow/gold satin

pic1Let’s work on the collar first.  Take two of your opposite.  If you would like to dress them up with some red sequins, I put a line of fabric lengthwise about 1 inch from the bottom of the collar, following the curve of the collar.  Then I put my strip of sequins on top, waited until it dried and sewed it in place.  The sequins are optional though so it’s up to you!  Next take a piece of collar without sequins and pin it on top of one of your first collar pieces, right sides together.  You will sew around three sides – the short sides and the bottom with 1/4″ seam allowance.  Leaves the top open, clip any curves and turn it right side out.  Press it nice and flat with your iron; repeat with the second collar piece.

Next you are going to take one of your front bodice pieces (there should be four; two are for the lining)  Place one of your pic2collar pieces along the neckline.  One end of the collar should be about 1/2″ from the shoulder, and the other edge should be 1″ from the centre of your bodice. (The collar in my picture is a bit smaller than yours will be, I revised the pattern slightly after making the dress).  Take another one of your opposite front bodice pieces (the lining) and pin it on top, right sides together.  Your collar should be sandwiched in the middle.  Starting at the edge of the shoulder, sew down along your collar and the centre edge of the bodice with 1/2″ seam allowance. Repeat this step for the other side of your front bodice.

pic3

Clip around any curves and turn your front bodice right side out.  Press nicely with your iron.  You should now have something like this:

pic4

———————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————

Are we ready to move on and attach the back of the bodice?  Good, let’s go.  Take one of your back bodice pieces and place it right side up.  Next lay your front bodice pieces on top, also right side facing up.  Make sure the arm holes and sides of the bodice are lined up with the back piece.  The centre pieces of the front bodice should over lap by about 3/4″, this will be where the buttons are added.  The collar edges should just be touching.

pic5

Grab your second back bodice piece and pin it along the shoulders and the neckline of the other back bodice piece, right sides together.  Your front bodice should be sandwiched in between.  Sew along the shoulders and the neckline BE VERY CAREFUL not to sew in the edge of the collar.  Sew with 1/2″ seam, clip the curves, turn right side out and press.

pic6—————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————

Time to work on the sleeves!  Take your two sleeve pieces to the iron.  Fold the long straight bottom edge over 1/4″ to the wrong side and press with your iron.  Next fold it over another 1/2″ and press again.

pic7

pic8Sew a gathering stitch along the top of the sleeve, to do this set your machine at a high tension and the stitch length at 4.  Repeat with the second sleeve.  Take your bodice and open it; lay it flat with the front facing up.  Pin one of your sleeves along the armhole, right sides together.  Make sure that your gathered sleeve is the same length as the arm hole, if not adjust it by either pulling on the thread or loosening it slightly.  I like to start pinning by finding the centre of the sleeve and pinning that to the shoulder seam.

pic9

Sew the sleeve to the bodice with a 1/2″ seam allowance.  Repeat these same steps to attach the other sleeve.

——————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————–

This next step is probably the trickiest one.  I am going to use a picture from one of my previous tutorials because it illustrates it perfectly. Fold your bodice so that the front and back are facing each other and the lining is facing outwards.  Pin the bodice along the sides and pin the sleeves together along the bottom.  If you have done it correctly, the sleeves should be pinned right sides together, and wrong sides facing out.  Unfold the edge of the sleeve that you had previously ironed over.  Sew all the way up the side and up the sleeve with 1/2″ seam allowance.  Finish your seam with a zig-zag stitch to prevent fraying.

Blog20

Hopefully that wasn’t too confusing!  Repeat this step on the other side.  Now you are going to the “hem” on your sleeves.  Fold your sleeve back the way it was, sew around the top edge of the folded part to create a casing for your elastic.  Leave about 1″ open at the bottom of the sleeve to thread your elastic through.  Cut your 1/4″ elastic to 7 1/2″ long.  Thread it through the casing.  Sew the hole shut and repeat steps for the second sleeve.

pic10

The last step to complete your bodice is to add the button holes and buttons to the front.  I used three buttons, it is up to you how many and what size buttons you would like to use.

—————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————

Let’s get that skirt put together, shall we?

Fold your skirt piece (12″x42″) in half width-wise, right sides together.  Sew down the long edge with 1/2″ seam, finish the seam with a zig-zag stitch.  Now we need to hem the skirt.  Fold up the bottom edge 1/4″ to the wrong side and press, fold again another 1/4″ and press again.  Sew down your hem.  We now need to mark on the skirt where the ruffle strips are going to go.  The first strip will be at the top of the skirt so you don’t need to measure that.  Measure 2 1/4″ down from the top of the skirt and make a mark with a pencil.  Make several marks around the skirt, all measuring 2 1/4″ from the top.  Next move down another 2 1/4″ from those marks and repeat, making marks around the skirt at this measurement.  Repeat this step two more times – you should have 4 sets of pencil markings 2 1/4″ apart.

pic11

pic12Prepare your ruffle strips – you may have had to sew more than one piece of fabric to get your 60″ in length, that is fine.  Fold your ruffle strip in half so that the short ends are right side together.  Sew the ends together with 1/2″  seam.  Don’t worry about finishing these ends with a zig-zag stitch since they won’t be visible.  Now you have a large circle.  Fold up the bottom half of the circle so that the two raw edges are aligned and the right sides are facing out. Press your ruffle in half with your iron.   Sew the top raw edges of the ruffle together with a zig-zag stitch to prevent fraying.  Do this with all five of your ruffle strips.  Lastly you need to sew a gathering stitch around the top of your ruffle.  Sew it just below the zig-zag stitch.  With the heavier fabrics like the denim or cow print you will either need to be very careful when pulling the thread to gather it (it may break), or maybe use a heavier thread like an upholstery thread.

Let’s get those ruffles attached to the skirt.  So there are five ruffles, starting from the top of the skirt here is how I organized it: Ruffle 1: Denim, Ruffle 2: Cow, Ruffle 3: Yellow/Gold, Ruffle 4: Denim, Ruffle 5: Cow.

We are going to start at the bottom of the skirt with Ruffle 5: Cow.  Take one of your cow ruffles and make sure it is gathered to the same width as the skirt.  Line up the top edge of the ruffle with the bottom markings on your skirt and pin it all the way around.  Sew it into place along the top edge – that’s it, super easy!  Repeat this step with Ruffle 4: Denim, placing the top edge along the markings above Ruffle 5.  The bottom edge of  ruffle should cover the top edge of ruffle 5 so that you don’t see the stitching.  Repeat this step until all 5 layers are sewn into place.  Ruffle 1 will be sewn onto the top edge of the skirt.  See picture below.

pic13

Sew a gathering stitch along the top edge of the skirt.  Now it is time to sew the skirt to the bodice.  Turn your skirt inside out.  Make sure that your bodice is right side out and that the buttons are done up.  Pin the top edge of the skirt to the bottom edge of the bodice, right sides together.  Make sure that your skirt is gathered to the same size as your bodice.  Also it looks much better if the seam of your skirt is at the back, centre, of the bodice.  Sew the skirt to the bodice with 1/2″ seam allowance.  Be careful to catch all the layers of the fabric; especially the denim so that none of the raw edges will show when you turn your dress right side out.  Almost done!  We just need to create the sash.  I apparently forgot to take pictures of this step but it’s very easy!

Take your piece of yellow satin fabric that is 4 1/2″ x 60″ (if you have had to sew more than one piece of fabric together to get this length, that is fine BUT make sure that your seam is not near the centre of the sash or else it will be visible).  With right sides together, sew the long edges of your sash with 1/4″ seam.  Turn right side out and press it flat with your iron.  Tuck the short open edges inside the sash and then sew it shut by top stitching along the edge.  Hand stitch the sash to the dress at each of the side seams of the bodice.  And that’s about it!  I did add some red sequins to the front of the sash as well, I’m not sure if I was happy with them but I will leave that up to you!

pic14

  Now your sweet Jessie is ready to party!  I hope you have enjoyed this sewing tutorial, I would love to see your own Sweet Jessie creations!  Thank you for stopping by.

signature

%d bloggers like this: